New Report, The Future of Home Care Technology 2012, Surveys Managers about Technology Use Among their Combined Total of 34,509 Workers

The report provides new insights about technology use in today’s booming world of in-home care. The 315 surveyed managers reflected a combined responsibility for a total of 34,509 workers in the non-medical, home health and geriatric care professions. For those surveyed, telephone and email dominate today’s communication toolkit – both internally and as a means of communicating with families. But as non-institutional home care plays a growing role in supporting families and older adults, a Home Care Information Network (HCIN) will form that enables information to follow the care recipient, boosting quality and informing and reassuring families.

Port St. Lucie, FL (PRWEB) July 16, 2012

The Future of Home Care Technology 2012, underwritten by LivHOME, Microsoft and Philips, provides insight into the technology use in today’s booming world of in-home care. The 315 surveyed managers reflected a combined responsibility for a total of 34,509 workers in the non-medical, home health and geriatric care professions. For those surveyed, telephone and email dominate today’s communication toolkit – both internally and as a means of communicating with families. But as non-institutional home care plays its growing role in supporting families and older adults, a Home Care Information Network (HCIN) will form that enables information to follow the care recipient, boosting quality and informing and reassuring families.

The just-released report was prepared by Aging in Place Technology Watch, a market research firm that tracks the technology industries that enable older adults to remain in their home of choice. According to Laurie M. Orlov, founder and Principal Analyst, the home care industries are poised to expand technology’s role in the in-home services delivered by providers of non-medical home care, home health care, and geriatric care management.

Bonnie Kearney, Director of Trustworthy Computing Communications for Accessibility and Aging at Microsoft, commented: “The technology used by caregivers will become increasingly important to older adults and their families. As technology is integrated into the daily activities of seniors, it has the power to transforms lives by helping individuals stay more connected, independent and active.”

Added Mike Nicholson, CEO of LivHOME: ““Technology is not the panacea, but it serves as a vital tool to assist both informal and formal caregivers to better care for those who require some assistance. Integrating high technology with high touch will result in better communication and coordination of care at an affordable price. Technology does not replace professionals but rather enhances the quality and availability of services within the continuum of care.”

Deb Citrin, Sr. Director, Strategy Business Development, Philips Home Healthcare Solutions, observed: “The demands for supportive home care will soon outstrip the supply of available “hands on” care. A range of new technology-based solutions will help extend this supply of “hands on” care — enabling tasks that require high touch to occur and be complemented by remote care tools. New solutions will bolster care in new and exciting ways, enabling caregivers to be more efficient and older adults to be more engaged and enabled to stay connected and independent.”

ABOUT AGING IN PLACE TECHNOLOGY WATCH

Long-time tech industry veteran Laurie M. Orlov is the leading analyst describing trends and technologies in the boomer and senior markets. This new report is one of a series of industry reports that also include the April, 2011 AARP “Connected Living for Social Aging: Designing Technology for All” and the 2012 updated Market Overview of Technology for Aging in Place.

Headquartered in Port St. Lucie, Florida, Aging in Place Technology Watch provides thought leadership, analysis and guidance about technologies and services that enable boomers and seniors to remain longer in their home of choice. In addition to her technology background and years as an industry analyst, founder Laurie M. Orlov is a member of the Philips Think Tank on Health Well-Being.

Orlov spent more than 30 years in the technology industry, including 24 years in IT and nine years as a leading industry analyst at Forrester Research. She is a recognized expert and has consulted to organizations like AARP and her insights have been referenced in publications like Kiplinger, the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and the New York Times.

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Laurie Orlov
Aging in Place Technology Watch
(772) 345-3725
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